Saturday, August 29, 2015

We now break from regular programming to announce a very special event!

The usual amateur conservationist isn't typically thinking about this until later in the autumnal season, but I'm here to draw your attention that we need to start thinking about this endangered migratory species NOW...because they're about the business of hatching new youngsters right now, here in Enid, in fields that typically get their habitat decimated.

Well, my yard is a preserve for these creatures no matter what the City opines about wild growth pertinent to the less important "property value" because these creatures hold my yard in higher value than the City does, or might.  This video of this endangered species was taken just a few minutes ago:


The City likes to make a big deal out of monarchs in the fall, and only in one downtown park, but it'll bend over backwards to kill off everything their babies eat in the meantime...and they don't exclusively eat only the plant called "milkweed".  As you see here, they love raising families on Honeyvine.

I'll bet they like Butterfly Weed as well, as they're all in the same family of plants called "milkweed".  But just as the name "weed" suggests, the City considers these noxious and in need of control, if not outright elimination.  I step forward to say that, because these creatures are endangered, we should instead be cultivating these plants.  They're the reason why monarchs come to Enid at all, so far away from the Mississippi River Flyway.

It's a commonly held belief that the larvae are poisonous, therefore they have no predators just because the birds won't eat them.  This isn't true, due to the fact that other insects will eat them, and that's also why I'll put metal screening around as many vines as I can.  The main predator is the wasp, and because my pecan trees will host tent worms without the wasps, I cultivate wasps here, too.  They don't care what kind of caterpillar they eat, and they do eat tent worm caterpillars, army worms, and, unfortunately, also Monarch and Swallowtail caterpillars.

Sunday mini-UPDATE:
I was wrong about this Monarch mom being the first just because it's the first one I noticed.  Examining known Honeyvine patches north near the alleyway revealed nearly-decimated vine leaves as if munching had been taking place for a couple of weeks already.  Didn't see any larvae, though, so they're either hiding or the wasps already nailed 'em. Hoping against hope that the former is the case; will do much closer monitoring of that area from here on out.

And from here on out, this blog will celebrate the entire month of August as Monarch Mommy Month.
Yup, gonna hashtag that. #MonarchMommyMonth

The following article appeared in the local newspaper this Sunday, and I've highlighted the important paragraphs in orange while underlining in red the portions that I, a seasoned, experienced Monarch rancher, take issue with:

Concocting theories is what scientists are good at, but no single one of them can cover the territory covered by Monarchs and unless they do better in-depth observation, they're going to completely miss the things that I've observed in raising these critters--like the fact that they go on a breeding marathon just before migration, and that the newborn adult Monarchs follow their elders on that trip and actually learn the route by being taught.  Scientist should seriously consider this theory as well as the theory that they stay closely clustered throughout the winter cycle because they're still guarding as well as teaching the neophyte what to do over winter and when the entire lot should endeavor to return. It's likely that scientists aren't looking at a simple mysterious clustering behavior, but actually a Monarch school.

Note there at the center bottom where I've underlined the part that states that no butterfly lives to make the round trip.  I'm sure that their efforts to tag Monarchs have lead to that conclusion, which also tacitly implies that what's necessary is for the previous generation to pass knowledge down to the new generation, and the length of time as well as scope of distance endangers any chemical markers due to temporal degradation of the same.  Well, I'm here to tell you that a Monarch is smart enough to recognize individual people and make the distinction between humans and other animals...and they certainly know a bird when they see one. These are things I have observed that no scientist has even been in any position to observe, apparently.

The next photo shows how Monarch ranching works in the yard, and with NO milkweed--it's 100% honeyvine...and at this point I presume you've watched the video first, which illustrates Monarch maternity phase.  What comes next is converting the yard into a Monarch maternity ward:


As mentioned in the video, the Monarch lays the eggs FIRST. She'll come back a number of times over a few days still looking for good places to lay. When she's absent, I'll mark the honeyvine seedlings that I've examined and found eggs on them with rebar, hopefully before the vines get too big and as you can see here, some of them have already grown to a length that can be awkward to manipulate...and then in this picture, you'll also notice that I mowed around the honeyvine tendrils.

So far, these steps were covered: 1) mom lays the eggs 2) locations were marked by rebar 3) the area gets mowed, dodging the vines 3) rebar gets replaced by tomato cages, and when they're all tomato-caged, the maternity ward transitions into nursery phase.

In the nursery phase, the tomato cages get covered by window screen to ward off predators, particularly wasps, and in that regard, find metal--not nylon/Fiberglas--screening preferable because wasps will chew through it.  Wasps chew a lot of things rather powerfully, and that's why I keep them around to feed on the tent worms that may choose to homestead my pecans.  Monarchs are protected, wasps get to prey on other pests, and everybody's happy.

Maternity ward detail:


Tuesday UPDATE: I just now signed up for a University of Minnesota monarch larvae monitoring project HERE.  Here we go. Before I signed up, there was only one red square on their map, near Tulsa. Now Oklahoma's sporting two, and the other one's me.


When I filled in the various forms, one form was to indicate what type of milkweed was growing on the property, and none of the selections mentioned Honeyvine.  They did have an option called Other, so I clicked on that and now Honeyvine is part of their list of milkweeds.  High time somebody recognized that plant as one preferred by Monarchs.




Wednesday mini-UPDATE: I still need to view the video training productions at this point, but I went out and checked my vines, and noted egg laying activity in the field north of my monitoring district. 6 moms were busy out there, only one noted over here. All eggs and no larvae was seen at this point, either.  Pictures of milkweed proper that I've viewed online show gazillions of eggs laid on a single leaf, which differs from the egg laying behavior here. Each mom lays one egg on one leaf per honeyvine seedling, and if there is more than one egg, then more than one mom paid a visit to that plant.  I'll sometimes find 2 or three on a single seedling, but not often.  They lay eggs only on the lower leaves of each seedling, and they won't lay eggs on more mature vines in blossom--they'll just feed on the nectar of those. Observation continues.

The training videos are up on YouTube, so what the hey--I might as well share them on this blog too.  This is the first of a set of 11 videos--the introduction....












After I learned all this procedural stuff, I went out in the yard to try to take inventory and I tell you what--it's amazing out there. I figured I didn't need all the stuff they put into a reporting kit because I've already got the basics of what I need to do it, and I'm going to keep a video log of what I find for reference.  I got about 4 square meters examined and I lost track of which ones I already looked at. And all my rebar is deployed, as are all of my spare tomato cages.  At the last home show I picked up a bunch of  I CALLED OKIE gasline marker flags, but I know I don't have enough of those either. Gee.  Still, it was fun to do and I saw some progress in the form of 3 hatched caterpillars, itsy bitsy "1st instar" stage, and two in the process of hatching, which was fascinating to watch.  Yes, you need a magnifying glass to partake of that, and there's one in their kit, but it's an awkward hand-held job and what I've got is a magnifying inspection visor I wear on my head.  I prefer to have my hands free for doing other stuff, like holding the camcorder.  When I process what I've got, you can bet I'll post those marvels here.  But in terms of collecting data, I'm just going to have to rassle up my gasline markers so that I can strategically flag the area already covered and enumerated.  Watch this space.

I just posted to YouTube the dry run I did this afternoon just to try out what I learned in those training videos, and I'm posting it for all those skeptics out there who don't recognize the honeyvine as a legit resource for monarchs.  If I'm lyin', I'm dyin'.  Here's the proof:




Friday, August 21, 2015

Madison's avenues through Christian U.S.A.

Just when I was getting ready to post a blog entry on the Ashley Madison hack job, new developments overrode the intended first entry and the fallout still keeps coming hard and fast.

...er...or should I rephrase that?

Ahem.

Anyway, subsequent to that initial revelation came articles about betrayal, monogamy, polygamy, multi-amorous, but at the bottom line, one can conclude that religion just doesn't guarantee morality, as our voting track record in favor of religious political leaders seems to suggest.  I dare say that the old protestant doggerel about how we're all sinners but we're all forgiven isn't going to be viewed in the same way again.

I've seen a map which maps what states were the heaviest providers of Ashley Madison (United States of Ashley Madison) accounts and I've heard never-ending expressions of astonishment how Utah was one of the most heavily tinted. Men seeking additional wives even though that's illegal? Yeah, right.



Face it, people--religions overhype the magical holy benefits of matrimony, after all, pretending that "dysfunctional" families don't exist and when they can't ignore them any more, label them "dysfunctional" even though they're more the rule than the exception, and there are both men and women out there who look at a hasty marriage and, years later, wonder if that grass really isn't actually greener on the outside of the home sanctuary, especially after getting into a routine where the crap you have to deal with is equally as routine and, therefore, foreseeable as repetitive without end.  That shit just gets old.

The rate of marriages have declined in recent years and it's no surprise that more people see through that overhyped racket. I'm happy for those people who have successfully made that institution work for them with no regrets, but it's time we as a society recognize just how rare that actually is.  But it is irrefutable fact that Ashley Madison was such a successful business that Bob Scully's The World Show featured the founder as an entrepreneur success story, and you KNOW how the biggest megachurches out there preach the prosperity gospel.

Aside from the overhyped morality bullshit religion preaches about the sanctity of what they say is a holy thing between one man and one woman, it's not just today's people who avoid marriage that thinks very little of that supposed sanctity--the married just joined the single crowd.  As for me, I don't need religion to know that you don't treat people you care about like that.

Images of public revenge taken on cheaters via SomeECards


Yeah. Two ladies talking in --HEAVEN--.  In heaven. Got that? Heaven.

Gee, gummint officialz found to have accounts...why is anybody surprised at this time honored tradition, actually?


Meanwhile back at a certain chicken ranch in Christian Texas...



The Ethical Hacker re: Digital Locksmiths on Bob Scully's The World Show

P.S.-- I've looked high and low for that specific "The World Show" on which Noel Biderman was interviewed by Bob Scully, and I can't even find it on Scully's own website. I did tape that, and when I find it I'll have to post that snippet here...but that's going to be a long tough row to hoe.

I don't know about you, but it just seems to me that the more sanctimonious a person claims to be, the more sinnin' they've got to bury under that facade.  Morality my ass.  NOW I'm convinced this is a Christian nation--behold our national pro-business Christianity.  Infidelity turns out to be an awesome business model which doesn't involve The World's Oldest Profession.






The principle clearly firmly in place in the City of Enid:


From outside the U.S. looking in, from where ISIS' charge of American lack of morals seems to be sticking: Al Arabiya article on Madison
Silver lining sighted by Crooks & Liars ...who would, going by people in their title.
It begins: EXTORTION. --The Hill
It's a brilliant business model, alright, and now the legal business is cashing in.
Article about Noel Biderman, April 24, and his business model: Business Insider, UK , where he shows that his grasp on gender equality is tenuous at best...


Seriously--this guy pimps out wives.  He's neglected to mention that marriage is skidding downhill, culling his hitched-hooker stable over time.  What this shows, too, is that the gender getting the short end of the stick (so to speak) in the marriage deal is the woman...but I could have told you that.  It's only well-to-do trophy wives who believe a word of what Phylis Schlaffley says. Or any child-abusing preacher/priest, for that matter.  What's striking here is that a man will part with money for tail, and the person who collects money for tail is a madam or pimp, but in this case, the hooker doesn't even get a dime--the pimp rakes in all of it. Respectable businessman, my ass.

Hey, don't lecture me about redneck linguistics/spelling.  I know.


You don't ever pay me enough to do that kind of shit and you're a grown boy. To quote Meatloaf: "I'll do anything for love but I won't do THAT".

Sunday miniUPDATE: Bob Scully's The World Show ran a snippet of the Noel Biderman interview this weekend on OETA, after a different interview for the most of that show. And I'm out of media to record it on, dammit.  It's out there somewhere.

Source:
Our World in Data website, but couldn't find this particular page easily from their front page.
Now this just in from Facebook, cropped for compliance with Blogger rules for a family rating...


Ah, I found it--a clip of the movie, The Chocolate Soldier, that I did post elsewhere but removed it.  It's certainly apropos, but I'll not explain the context this time--take it as you will.

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Thursday miniUPDATE:
This just in via Glenn Greenwald, via The Intercept---a letter from a female client of Ashley Madison...in part below...

...and THIS just in via BBC World although the article doesn't say what the US broadcast said about how a lot of the female accounts were just made up by staff.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I get the bit about being trapped in terrible marriages, but what I don't get is how a spouse coming down with cancer makes her needs some kind of priority to her, as if he wasn't a family member she cares about. Bottom line is that she just doesn't care.  What she's committed is a cruelty to somebody who really needs her and she's having none of anybody else's needs but her own.  Glenn Greenwald comes off as sympathetic to this point of view and I don't get why, quite frankly.  She deserves sympathy and the cancer-stricken husband is what?  Just so much chopped liver.  Sorry, but he's not the one who made that marriage terrible, the way I look at it.
And yeah--I submitted a comment reflecting that, and the fact that she's just a pimped out housewife who ain't getting paid by the company she's servicing.  Sucker.



And this just in, now that it's Friday: Noel Biederman is stepping down from running things.  Well well well.

Being the consummate asshole is certainly one of the options.

Now the L. A. Progressive weighs in (screenshot):

Turnabout is fair foreplay.



Sunday UPDATE, Viacom Edition:
Jon Stewart left The Daily Show and Stephen Colbert is about to debut on CBS and traffic to my blog has picked up on the entry Dear Viacom, Suddenlink: Sincerely, the Audience, posted when the aforementioned cable provider wouldn't pay the higher fee that Viacom was demanding, and as we know, Viacom packages The Daily Show.  So yeah--no Suddenlink customer was able to see Jon's Big Goodbye.  But I did mention, in that earlier post, that Viacom's stock value had dropped considerably, too, and there was the matter of Viacom's obvious inability to raise revenue by advertising from advertisers who spend big money depending on the size of the audience their ads get for their money.  I further observe that large portions of Stewart's regular audience got cut off and, now that he's left, he's also free to reconnect to the audience Viacom lost, by means outside of Viacom.  Same is true for Colbert, although John Oliver's audience overlapping both of those remain restricted by HBO's unavailability to a general, wider audience.  Of the three, Colbert is the one who, in terms of audience availabilty, "hit the big time".

Sure, Jon's replacement deserves a fair hearing, but Viacom will remain a barrier to that, alas, as is true of what I expect to be a stellar presentation in The Nightly Show.  As was the case with CBS getting in the way of Robin Williams, it's Viacom that stands in the way--not any failure on the part of the talent.  Investors in either or both CBS and Viacom also keep analytical eyes on other cable content organizations, too, and notice the growth of TBS and a few others, pretty much at the expense of Viacom's stable of brands, and will take their investment money where the audience growth is...even if it means investing in a non-cable content provider like Netflix.

That earlier post about Viacom is a very old post, without a doubt, but Viacom hasn't noticed, and hasn't moved on, as evidenced by screenshots of its Comedy Central website I took just today:


This comes up where an advertiser's ad should be, but isn't.  Instead of clicking on the Close button, I clicked on the ad, and the following came up:


Those buttons at the bottom are partially displayed in that screen shot, so next I'll post a shot of the complete buttons:


The text calls on you to change provider, but Suddenlink is the only provider in many rural areas and even in medium sized cities like Enid.  Get a refund?  Get real.

At the bottom of the text area, right below where they proclaim that you should switch providers today and get your channels back, is a row of 4 circles.  The blue circle indicates the current page you're on, and there are 4 pages...the next one of which proclaims that you'll be missing out on the launch of a new program, King Tut or some such, I forget (it's forgettable). Third page goes back to Spongebob, who gets repeated billing because he's Viacom's big moneymaker, apparently (guffaw).


All four pages have a little blurb like what you see on the left of this image: "WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW  LEARN MORE".  That blurb is a link which sends you to another screed about a whole lot of things you're missing when you don't get Viacom, but each page sends you to different pages.   One of those links sends you here...


...but on the last of the four pages, which looks like this...


...provides you a link to LEARN MORE...which goes to this li'l gem...


Yeah.  The link is "brocken".  You don't get the customary Error 404 Page Not Found.  You get curiously spelled pseudo-English.

And I'm sure Viacom investors have noticed by now.  Ya think?

And there's an update on the City of Enid's hostile take over of the corporation of PEGASYS and its destruction of PEGASYS intellectual property in the form of recorded and produced content: a city cannot claim copyright rights over city council/city commission recordings--only an independent corporation like PEGASYS can do that. Although this is a ruling for California, it's a legal case that is useable in any future argument on that subject matter.

Friday, August 14, 2015

Amid the celebration of the U.S. embassy in Cuba, Libyan friends at high risk from ISIS incursion in Sirte

Trade opening up in Cuba makes for a Big Hairy Deal in Oklahoma economics and I would be celebrating that if it weren't for the world focus being on Iran and Syria while turning a blind eye to Libya, which is another case of a dictator deposed, leaving a vacuum for ISIS to fill.  Just as I have friends in Cameroon whose major worry is Boko Haram, I have friends in Libya at immediate risk at the hands of ISIS, so I'm not in a celebratory mood today.

BBC report

International Business Times article
Update from the BBC


Posted on Facebook by a Libyan friend:


Mini UPDATE: This just in via Reuters--Libya asks Arabs to bomb ISIS here



Wednesday UPDATE: a Facebook friend in Sirte posted these pictures of a city turned into a ghost town.  Word is that Benghazi has still been under Daesh fire ever since the US Ambassador was killed and although things aren't this desperate elsewhere in Libya, the cancer nonetheless still grows while the world's attention remains focused on Syria and Iran.  More's the pity.





Tuesday, August 04, 2015

Carmen Enid, Carmen Possum, Comme Ci, Comme Ça

Mini UPDATE just to say hello to my 4 activity trackers.  I'll keep you coming back to my blog, and I appreciate the addition you make to my blog traffic.  :D

Hehehe--and you thought I couldn't see you just because you have Blogger stats turned off, huh.  You forget you're messing with a techie geek over here.  Yup--that's what I was doing instead of posting a new blog entry: *I* was watching *YOU*.  Now then--as I type this, I'm watching CSPAN's rebroadcast of Richard J. Danzig's presentation on the topic of cyber security, and just got a chuckle out of his citing the Stuxnet incident with Iranian centrifuges, and, keeping in mind what I was saying about technical ongoing surveillance Iran agreed to in the #IranDeal, and then commenting that we should be interested in leaner software that doesn't present all kinds of bells/whistles capability because those are also vulnerabilities to exploit, too...and thought of Microsoft bloatware.  I'm certain that both the EU and the IAEA know better, too.

Where bloatware has been the Microsoft business model since Gates ripped off Apple's Excel and operating system to come up with Windows, while still responding to CP/M commands, any Microsoft product would necessarily be out of  the picture.  Big question, though--who else is out there that's better AND as ubiquitous, hm?  Yeah. Big snag there.

As gri might say--grivitational pull is everywhere.





I'm glad that schedule conflicts don't happen often--you know, like they did for OK Mozart & DeadCENTER, as posted about earlier, but I anticipate similar situations for the upcoming FLY Film Fest in Enid later this year--it's what happens at film fests, alas.  But a schedule conflict occurred tonight between the City Commission meeting and the wrap up of Enid Symphony's Summer Wine series...and...they wrapped up with selections from the opera Carmen.

Ah, yes, the French via Seville.  I've said it before and I'll say it again--much of Spain's story is French, alors.

I did manage to deal with both, and entirely by conventional means this time, and boy was I glad I did--one of the singers tonight was the same guy who stole the show at the July 4th fireworks thing: tenor Brett Payne. Yowza.  But I don't intend to cut Doug Newell short--he's pretty much a treat in his own right, beginning the evening's fête thus (and I apologize for Blogger's crappy restrictions on video quality)

video

Doug Newell indulged in a lengthy but most entertaining background story of Carmen composure before the singers came out and actually sung, but here I must confess that, by and large, I can't stand opera as a rule.  There are a few rare exceptions to that rule, and Carmen's one of 'em.  And Doug Newell makes exceptions more exceptional, without a doubt.

I'll now fast forward to the end of the presentation, but because of Blogger restrictions, need to cut it off just as Brett Payne takes the stage.  What Blogger forces me to do is post better, longer videos elsewhere in cyberspace, so if you're on Facebook, you'll get to see those next, there, and in better quality.

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I'll have some more to post about the Enid City Commission, but not tonight.  It's been a big day and at this point, I'm winding down.  But by all means stay tuned, you know there'll be more here. Oh--about the possum...well, that's a favorite sort-of-Latin poem from 'way back in time, and those of you who know that I'm a Red Green fan, you know that I'm fond of their sort-of-Latin motto as well.  Quando omni flunkus moritati.

But while you're waiting for the rest of the stuff I want to post about, enjoy Carmen Possum:

THE NOX was lit by lux of Luna,
And 'twas a nox most opportuna
To catch a possum or a coona;
For nix was scattered o'er this mundus,
A shallow nix, et non profundus.
On sic a nox with canis unus,
Two boys went out to hunt for coonus.
The corpus of this bonus canis
Was full as long as octo span is,
But brevior legs had canis never
Quam had hic dog; et bonus clever.
Some used to say, in stultum jocum
Quod a field was too small locum
For sic a dog to make a turnus
Circum self from stem to sternus.
Unus canis, duo puer,
Nunquam braver, nunquam truer,
Quam hoc trio nunquam fuit,
If there was I never knew it.
This bonus dog had one bad habit,
Amabat much to tree a rabbit,
Amabat plus to chase a rattus,
Amabat bene tree a cattus.
But on this nixy moonlight night
This old canis did just right.
Nunquam treed a starving rattus,
Nunquam chased a starving cattus,
But sucurrit on, intentus
On the track and on the scentus,
Till he trees a possum strongum,
In a hollow trunkum longum.
Loud he barked in horrid bellum,
Seemed on terra vehit pellum.
Quickly ran the duo puer
Mors of possum to secure.
Quam venerit, one began
To chop away like quisque man.
Soon the axe went through the truncum
Soon he hit it all kerchunkum;
Combat deepens, on ye braves!
Canis, pueri et staves
As his powers non longius carry,
Possum potest non pugnare.
On the nix his corpus lieth.
Down to Hades spirit flieth,
Joyful pueri, canis bonus,
Think him dead as any stonus.
Now they seek their pater's domo,
Feeling proud as any homo,
Knowing, certe, they will blossom
Into heroes, when with possum
They arrive, narrabunt story,
Plenus blood et plenior glory.
Pompey, David, Samson, Caesar,
Cyrus, Black Hawk, Shalmanezer!
Tell me where est now the gloria,
Where the honors of victoria?
Nunc a domum narrent story,
Plenus sanguine, tragic, gory.
Pater praiseth, likewise mater,
Wonders greatly younger frater.
Possum leave they on the mundus,
Go themselves to sleep profundus,
Somniunt possums slain in battle,
Strong as ursae, large as cattle.
When nox gives way to lux of morning,
Albam terram much adorning,
Up they jump to see the varmin,
Of the which this is the carmen.
Lo! possum est resurrectum!
Ecce pueri dejectum,
Ne relinquit back behind him,
Et the pueri never find him.
Cruel possum! bestia vilest,
How the pueros thou beguilest!
Pueri think non plus of Caesar,
Go ad Orcum, Shalmanezer,
Take your laurels, cum the honor,
Since ista possum is a goner!

And now a public service announcement for tourists headed to Enid:


Yes--what a lovely shrubbery. City watered, Main Street Enid manicured, lush.



Friday, July 24, 2015

Livin' On Tulsa Time--got a lot of catching up to do in Enid

Took some time off to see the big wingding over at Tulsa's Philbrook Art Museum where they were celebrating the art of someone associated with the movie Grand Budapest Hotel and I'm just now draggin' my tailbone in to make a short post about that, and I know it's been a while since my last post.

Just going to post this brief update for now, and will go into more depth tomorrow or something.  And just to say that there's just something special about some ghosts that just don't go away with time, or with distance (this, too, was in Tulsa, and it was just today)...

video

Regular readers of this blog already know that I'm a big Walter Van Brunt fan, so there ya go, folks.  And don't be misled by the word "Re-Creation" on the label, this is NOT a latter-day remake fake. What you see here is a genuine Diamond Disk, and that's the kind of player he's referring to.

Here's another gem at his location--a Victrola after Victor was spun off by Emile Berliner, but before RCA took over:

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Detail shots...




So yeah, like so many of the other trips I take, this one definitely turned out to be an adventure.

Mid-August Postscript: This just in at the local thrift shop:

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Mechanical volume control that variably mutes the horn.  Now, that speed adjusting mechanism looks like an easy fix from my vantage point.  It appears to me that the knob's pointer needs to be atop that pin.



Ongoing UPDATE: The gent in the above video also stated that he had a large collection of 78 rpm records and some cylinders, which he donated to Tulsa's Gilcrease Museum, and that Gilcrease did indeed have a laser player for them.  Therefore it's official--I'm going to visit Gilcrease again, with that specifically in mind, and, as you might guess, with Walter Van Brunt specifically in mind, ha.

As for my latest trip to Tulsa, here are some visuals from the Philbrook Museum:


They were sponsoring a free-to-the-public event in the garden, for which this was one of numerous announcements:


Got there early myself, and below was the scene as guests started filing in after 7 pm.  And they were still coming in by droves when I took this pic:


Left early to beat the stampede, only to discover that the optimum parking spot I found below the top deck of the parking area meant that upon exit, I had to drive by the loads of overflow parking out on the streets, and that extended for many blocks!  Wow.

The Philbrook gardens are just spectacular all year 'round, and the setting sun put a gilded edge on things besides. Breathtakingly gorgeous out there.





Gilcrease, on the other hand, sustained significant storm damage, and one of the galleries that got hit was their awesome Vista Room.  It was empty of displays but it wasn't closed off to the public as a couple of other of their galleries were.



Sometimes having electronic eyeballs in the form of a camera can be applied to great advantage in this situation on the main floor of Gilcrease:


...because with electronic eyeballs, you can get a much closer look...



One of the many things that makes Gilcrease cool is that they have an open-to-the-public archaeology section down in the basement, and you can bet I went down there, too.

Another iron in the fire is tracking down what the hell happened to Enid TV station, KXOK, and so far from the FCC I found a license, but it expired in June 2014, and it's also on an FCC list of translators. Something is badly screwed up somewhere.




....but back to Gilcrease, actively involving both kids and adults in some interesting historical venues including archaeology, and some of this stuff Gilcrease does is of relatively recent vintage.







Some of these would do better as an archaeology category, IMHO...






Because Blogger continues to have unreasonable restrictions on blog videos, I'm posting the next one without audio, hoping that it doesn't get rejected in mp2 format...and it got rejected, dammit. Converting it to Windows Media format, then, but there's still no audio.  It shows a glimpse of what's in the basement, in the Kravis Discovery Center, important in conjunction with the recent opening of its Helmerich Center dedicated to the history of the Americas.


It's been long, LONG overdue for Oklahoma to get serious about its French history and the only museum that looks like it's doing any kind of good in that department is Gilcrease.  Anyway, here's the vid in stinky Windows WMV format so expect blurry detail--I'll have to come up with something else, I suppose, but not just right now. Meh.

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